Many of us have shared the common experience of being chided by our parents for sitting too close to the TV or holding our phones too close. We’re sure that their nags are often met with eye rolls and inner rebuttals about how they’re being dramatic. But what if their criticisms held some truth? 

Credit: Vlada Karpovich 

What is Blue Light? 

Apart from the potential harm that screens can do to your vision, the blue light emitted by your devices can impact your sleep cycles and damage your skin’s cells directly. Before we delve deeper into the hidden dangers of blue light, let’s first understand it.  

Light comes in a variety of wavelengths – this allows us to perceive different shades of it. The harmful blue light is light in blue wavelengths. Blue light is often emitted from electronics with screens as well as energy-efficient lighting. While blue light isn’t inherently negative – during daylight hours, they can boost attention, reaction times and mood – extended exposure at night can be extremely disruptive. 

Effects of Blue Light 

Blue Light and Sleep: 

The most prominent result of blue light exposure (especially at night) is a disrupted sleep cycle. Exposure to blue light suppresses the body’s secretion of melatonin – a hormone that influences the body’s circadian rhythm (aka your body clock). This makes it harder to fall asleep and impacts the restful quality of your sleep.   

Blue Light and Skin: 

In terms of skin, the disrupted sleep cycle caused by blue light impacts the skin’s ability to repair itself from damage and inflammation. Additionally, poor sleep comes a whole host of skin-related issues. Dark eye circles, weaker skin barrier, increased dryness in the skin and a loss of suppleness in the skin resulting in loose skin with deeper wrinkles.   

Beyond matters of sleep, exposure to blue light throughout the day can destroy collagen through oxidative stress. Blue light has been shown to penetrate deeper into the skin than UVA and UVB rays – specifically, the dermis where the skin’s collagen and elastin lies. This allows blue light to age skin faster. Over time, this means a loss of suppleness in the skin and deeper wrinkles.   

For darker skin tones, studies have shown that exposure to blue light can cause hyperpigmentation (particularly in medium to darker skin tones).  

Credit: Christina Morillo 

How to Protect Your Skin 

While reducing the time spent with screens can largely contribute to protecting your skin from blue light, it’s a rather hard option to execute given the increased reliance on computers for work and leisure.   

At Home: 

With blue light being emitted from light bulbs at home, consider switching them from cooler shades to warmer or natural ones. Furthermore, night lights used to soothe you to sleep can also emit blue light (which ironically makes falling asleep harder). Thus, it’s best to switch the bulbs for a warmer shade or omit them for a more restful night’s sleep.  

Additionally, where possible, consider using dim red lights during the night as they are less likely to shift your circadian rhythm and suppress melatonin production. 

For Computers & Phones:  

If working late at night, midnight Netflix binges or scrolling social media just before bed is part of your daily routine, switch on “Eye Saver Modes” or “Night mode” to reduce the blue light emitted by your screen. These modes turn the screen a slight shade of yellow to minimise the amount of blue light emitted.   

Should your devices not come with the above modes, programs like f.lux help to control the blue light emitted based on your circadian rhythm for minimal disruption to your internal body clock. 

However, these are tools to mitigate the effects of blue light. Whenever possible, avoid screens and other electronic devices 2 to 3 hours before bed to minimise its impact on your circadian rhythm. 

Blue Light Blocking Glasses: 

Glasses aren’t just a fashion accessory or tool for the visually impaired. They can be used to protect your eyes from harmful blue light emitted from screens. For those of us who already wear glasses daily, replacing your regular lenses with PC lenses or blue light cancelling lenses provides you with an additional layer of protection.   

Furthermore, having blue light blocking lenses allows your glasses to protect the delicate skin around the eyes from oxidative stress that results from blue light exposure.   

Skincare: 

SPF’s protective capabilities are highly underrated. Not only does it protect you from the photoaging effects of UVA rays and burning effects of UVB, but it can protect you from the photoaging effects of blue light! To be specific, mineral SPF (SPF that contains iron oxides, zinc oxides or titanium oxides) have been best proven to protect the skin from blue light exposure. A good trick to know if the SPF you have is mineral or not is to see if it’s tinted – like our Skin Perfecting Moisturiser. 

In addition to a protective layer of SPF daily, skincare products rich in antioxidants help counter the oxidative stress the skin undergoes from blue light exposure. Common yet potent antioxidants include Vitamin A, C and E, Caffeine and Niacinamide. Our recommendations? Give our Botanical Soothing Gel a shot at soothing, moisturising and infusing your skin with its potent antioxidants.  

Looking to protect your delicate eye area from blue light’s oxidative stress? Try the RevitalEyes Concentrate – packed with Niacinamide and Caffeine to counteract oxidative stress while leaving you with youthful, revitalised eyes. 

Start protecting your eyes, skin and health from the harmful effects of blue light with these tips and enjoy restful nights and refreshed skin. 

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With the world’s faces being shrouded behind a mask, eyes have become the new focal point on every face. While this provides us with an opportunity to flaunt another feature on our faces, the pandemic has also taken its toll on our eyes. Prolonged hours spent on our screens thanks to lockdowns and work from home arrangements have left our eyes surrounded by dark rings, fine lines and puffiness. Want to free your eyes of their grasp? Keep reading on as we uncover the causes behind common eye issues and how to tackle them from the root! 

Credit: Vlada Karpovich 

Common Eye Issues:  

Long before everyone was stuck home, we each experienced our fair share of dark under eyes, fine lines and puffiness – especially if we spent nights burning the midnight oil. But what exactly causes these issues?  

Dark Eye Circles:  

Though dark eye circles look adorable on pandas, they certainly are not doing us any favours. Apart from genetics, dark eye circles are a result of a combination of bad habits – sleep deprivation, eye strain and sun overexposure.   

Sleep Deprivation:  

Sleep deprivation causes the blood vessels under the thin skin of the eye to dilate, creating a dark appearance. Additionally, sleep deprivation can also cause fluids to build up underneath the eyes, making them appear puffy and casting a shadow on your under eyes.  

Eye Strain:  

Though spending long hours staring at a screen is inevitable given current circumstances, the long hours cause us to strain our eyes. This strain causes the blood vessels around our eyes to dilate, leaving behind a dark appearance.   

Sun Overexposure:  

While the feeling of the sun’s warm touch on the skin is great, too much can cause your body to produce an excess of melanin (aka pigmentation) which can cause the skin to darken and darken the under-eye area. 

Credit: Andrea Piacquadio 

Puffy Eyes:  

No one wants to wake up to puffy eyes. Like dark under-eye circles, puffy eyes are largely caused by fluid retention. Fluid retention can be a result of multiple factors: Sleep deprivation, poor lymphatic drainage system, high salt diets and alcohol.   

Sleep Deprivation:   

As mentioned, a lack of sleep causes a buildup of fluids under the eyes, making them appear puffy.  

Poor Lymphatic Drainage System:  

Your lymphatic system is responsible for draining fluids that carry toxins, immune cells and waste products. When working poorly, it causes our tissues to be swollen with fluid. This fluid retention causes the puffiness often seen in your arms, legs and face just as you awaken.   

High Salt Diets & Alcohol:  

While salty foods can soothe your cravings, it often results in your body retaining more fluids than necessary. Likewise, alcohol causes your body to become dehydrated, causing the body to retain more fluids and sodium which leads to puffiness overall. 

Credit: Daria Shevtsova 

Fine Lines & Wrinkles Around Eyes:  

Fine lines and wrinkles around the eyes are inescapable as we age – our skin loses its elasticity, and our facial muscles weaken. However, there are certain habits we have that we unknowingly do that make fine lines and wrinkles more prominent.   

Sun Overexposure:  

The sun is back to contribute to our endless list of skincare woes. UV rays cause the skin to experience photoaging – a process that damages collagen and results in wrinkle formation.   

Squinting and Frowning:  

While we don’t recommend living your life with minimal facial expressions, the repeated motion of frowning or squinting (especially at your screens) causes the muscles in those areas to contract. The repeated contraction causes the skin to wrinkle. As the muscle strengthens due to repeated movements, the wrinkles would also become deeper.   

Rubbing Your Eyes:  

Rubbing the sleep from your eyes can be the best feeling in the world, but the rubbing action stretches the thin skin of your eye area. Over time, it can stretch the skin and breakdown the collagen and elastin in the area. The same concept applies when applying or removing makeup from the eyes. Rubbing the delicate area is a no-go. 

Credit: Karolina Grabowska 

Tackling Your Eye Issues:  

It is highly likely that you experience several of these issues simultaneously and it can get tedious to incorporate various tips to tackle them. Thankfully, we’ve narrowed them down to three essential tips to help combat your eye issues at the root.  

#1: Sleep is Precious  

The world never sleeps, but this doesn’t mean you should burn yourself out to keep up with it. Catching sufficient quality sleep can do wonders for your productivity, health and skin. An adult should get an average of 7 to 9 hours of uninterrupted sleep.   

Some quick tips to help you get the sleep you need are:  

Set a sleep schedule – falling asleep and waking up at the same time daily can help set a loop on your natural body clock (aka your circadian rhythm) and allow you to catch quality sleep.  
Reduce blue light exposure – blue light is light often emitted by electronic devices. It affects your circadian rhythm by tricking your body into thinking it’s still daytime, making it harder to fall asleep. Setting your computers and phones to restrict blue light along with minimising your use of devices 1-2 hours before bed can make a huge difference.   

#2: SPF is your BFF  

We love our SPF. Our day cannot start if our faces aren’t protected from the sun. Even at home, your skin is not protected from UV Rays. Thus, protecting your skin with a simple SPF every morning can do wonders for your skin. It drastically slows the photoaging process, protects the skin from developing pigmentation and reduces the risk of developing skin cancers. Give our Flawless- Skin Perfecting Moisturiser a try – crafted with skin-loving ingredients that would nourish and protect your skin simultaneously. 

#3: Invest in the Right Skincare  

Many get the impression that eye-care products are an unnecessary luxury – thanks to their typically small packaging and higher prices. However, investing in a good eye care product can significantly revitalise your eyes and restore youth to them.   

Say hello to the Porcelain RevitalEyes Concentrate, a unique silicon and oil-free formula which fuses the lightweight texture of an eye gel with the ultra-moisturising effect of an eye cream to impart 7-in-1 benefits, further supercharged with a built-in high-frequency micro-vibration and micro-current massaging device.

Treat your eyes to the supercharged eye care marvel with code  RC15% for 15% off your first RevitalEyes Concentrate! 

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You could spend a bomb on anti-aging products but look terribly old if you don’t invest in the right eye skincare. With its skin being ten times thinner than the rest of your face, the eye area requires the most care. We discuss how to provide the right care for the most delicate part of your face.

Did you know?

The average human blinks around 10,000 times a day. Having this fragile skin overexert itself like that, it comes as no surprise that the first tell-tale signs of your age show up here. As you age, collagen and elastin production decelerate and the skin loses what supports its shape. This is when the skin sags, and fine lines (or laugh lines) appear around the eye.

To avoid this, most people run looking for the richest eye cream.

That, however, is a grave misconception. Thick formulas that are overly emollient on the skin around the eyes can cause milia seeds. (Read more about what milia seeds are here)  When the product is too thick to be quickly absorbed by the skin, it could cause clogging, thus leading to tiny seeds around the eye area. Instead, opt for lighter gels or serums that penetrate the skin quicker.

Overexposure to sunlight is also a major factor of aging around the eyes.

Therefore, be sure not to forget the SPF for your eye area! Caring for the skin around your eyes should start as early as 25, but it’s never too late to start.

Not having enough sleep every night?

Puffy eyes, unsightly dark eye rings and huge eye bags are your eyes form of protest. The blood vessels supplying oxygen and nutrients are smaller in thin skin, and therefore the skin under your eyes are more susceptible to the issues your body face.

FIX IT!

Packed with 10 active ingredients, Porcelain’s RevitalEyes Multipeptide Silk Mask is intelligently designed to counter brightening, anti-aging and puffiness around the eye. It taps on the ancient benefits of silk and reduces the appearance of delicate lines, bringing a brighter glow to your eyes. Apply it diligently twice a week, on top of the use of your eye product, and experience, firmer, tauter and brighter eyes!

What are Milia Seeds?

Pretty as they sound, these are not flower seeds. Also known as oilseeds, milia seeds are keratin-filled bumps that usually develop around the eye and nose area. They’re the bane of every quest to silky smooth skin because they cause a rough and uneven skin texture. Commonly found in people of all ages, they form when the skin does not slough off normally and get trapped in pores. Not so pretty now, are they?

Milia Seeds 101: What are they?

What Causes Them?

Milia seeds are often caused by overly rich creams or oil-based skin care products. For some people, they are hereditary or caused by hormonal changes. Certain medications and pollutants can also be contributing factors. However, before you start panicking about those little white bumps on your face, do note that these are fairly harmless.

How To Prevent Them?

Milia Seeds 101: Avoid creams that are too rich for the eye area

Avoid using creams that are too rich for your eye area as it might cause pore congestion. Rich concealers are often silent causes as people often use them to cover up dark eye circles. Consider using an oil-free lotion or cream, or possibly change products altogether, as an allergy may also be a cause. Sunburns may also cause damage leading to the cysts, so be sure to wear sunblock if burning is a problem. Most importantly, keep your hands off your face to prevent excess bacteria from getting on it!

How To Get Rid Of Milia Seeds?

Common ways include the use of a topical retinoid cream such as tretinoin, tazarotene or adapalene; removal with a sterile lancet or scalpel followed by the use of a comedone extractor, a tool used to remove whiteheads and blackheads; a series of fruit acid peels or microdermabrasion procedures; and carbon dioxide laser treatment. You should consult a dermatologist or aesthetic specialist for the appropriate course of treatment. Most importantly, do not try to remove them by squeezing them yourself, as it will very likely lead to scars.

PS: Porcelain’s Precision Facials helps to effectively remove milia seeds. For targeted milia seed removal, check out our RevitalEyes TreatmentBook now or call 6227 9692 or Whatsapp us at 9721 1008 to find out more.

Did you know your skin weighs twice as much as your brain? That its even heavier than your intestines? Many of us take our skin for granted, but we really should take better care of it. Here are some fun facts about skin.

1. The Skin Is The Largest Organ

Fun facts about skin: It's the largest and heaviest organ

Credit: Milada Vigerova

Skin covers all body surfaces. The skin of an average adult weighs 8-10 pounds and has an average area of about 22 square feet. The purpose is to protect the body from injury, infection, heat, cold, and store water, fat and vitamins. The human skin is rejuvenated about once every four weeks.

Thinking of your skin as an organ, rather than something that we can use and abuse, puts things in proper perspective. Your skin is a wonderfully resilient organ and for the most part, can survive virtually any form of punishment. The skin is the body’s boundary: tough enough to resist all sorts of environmental assaults, yet sensitive enough to feel a breeze.

2. Your Skin Is Made Up Of 3 Layers

Fun facts about skin: It's made of three layers

Your skin has three major layers – epidermis, dermis and hypodermis.

The epidermis is waterproof, preventing unnecessary loss of water across the body surface. The skin’s rich abundance of blood flow and sweat glands regulate the loss of heat from the body, helping to control body temperature.

The dermis is the second major layer of the skin. It is a strong, flexible connective tissue. The dermis is richly supplied with nerve fibres and blood vessels. The blood vessels of the dermis are so extensive that it can hold 5% of all blood in the body. When organs need more blood, e.g. exercising muscles, the nervous system constricts the blood vessel located in the dermis. This shunts more blood into the general circulation, making it available to the muscles and other organs.

The hypodermis is also called the subcutaneous layer. It consists of both areolar and adipose connective tissue, although the adipose tissue normally dominates. Besides storing fat, the hypodermis anchors the skin to the underlying structures (mostly to muscles) and allows the skin to slide relatively freely over those structures. Sliding skin protects us by ensuring most blows just glance off our bodies.

3. Dusty House? That’s Your Dead Skin

A large amount of the dust in your home is actually dead skin. Your skin loses about 30,000 to 40,000 dead skin cells from the surface almost every minute, even though you do not see it happening. This is why exfoliating is so important to keep that healthy glow! It sheds a layer of these dead cells every 24 hours and renews itself about every 28 days. Unfortunately, this process slows as you age.

4. Your Brother Isn’t Heavy, But Your Skin Is

The average person’s skin weighs twice as much as their brain.  After the skin, here are the five heaviest organs in the body:

  1. Intestines – 7.5 pounds (4 pounds for the large intestine, 3.5 pounds for the small)
  2. Lungs – 5 pounds (2.5 pounds each)
  3. Liver – 3.2 pounds
  4. Brain – 3 pounds
  5. Heart – 0.6 pounds

5. The Skin On Your Lips Is Very Sensitive

Fun facts about skin: The Skin On Your Lips Is Very Sensitive

Credit: freestocks.org

The skin on your lips is 200 times more sensitive than that on your fingertips. Receptor cells in your body give your brain information — about the world around you and about what’s going on inside of you. Each type of receptor cell is able to give you a different type of information.

So, the greater the number of receptors a body part has, the more sensitive it will be. It is also true that the lips do have many of these touch receptors. When scientists list the top areas of the body in terms of sensitivity, the lips and fingertips are often ranked as the areas with the highest concentrations of receptor cells.